Down Argentine Way (1940)

"They have wonderful horses in South America."

"Wonderful horses…and wonderful men. South America, here we come!"

shared 3 hours ago, with 116 notes - via / source + reblog


joelmccrea:

you should watch the entire thing but if you’re an impatient bastard please go to 4:15

shared 12 hours ago, with 17 notes - via / source + reblog


shared 12 hours ago, with 12 notes - via / source + reblog


greeneyes55:

Washington D.C. 1935 
Photo: Anonymous
 Harris & Ewing Archive 

greeneyes55:

Washington D.C. 1935 

Photo: Anonymous

Harris & Ewing Archive 

shared 12 hours ago, with 164 notes - via / source + reblog


gingerrogerss:

Ginger Rogers at the Rainbow Room, 1936

gingerrogerss:

Ginger Rogers at the Rainbow Room, 1936

shared 15 hours ago, with 117 notes - via / source + reblog


The Public Enemy (1931)
shared 16 hours ago, with 93 notes - via / source + reblog


got this baby for $88

got this baby for $88

shared 18 hours ago, with 2 notes + reblog


shared 18 hours ago, with 274 notes - via / source + reblog



PLAYED 14 TIMES

leoreisman:

I Know Myself | George Olsen Orchestra | 1932

shared 18 hours ago, with 5 notes - via / source + reblog


shared 18 hours ago, with 74 notes - via / source + reblog



Thelma Todd in Horse Feathers (1932)

Thelma Todd in Horse Feathers (1932)

shared 22 hours ago, with 87 notes - via / source + reblog


shared 22 hours ago, with 132 notes - via / source + reblog



Joan Crawford in Grand Hotel, 1932.

Joan Crawford in Grand Hotel, 1932.

shared 1 day ago, with 213 notes - via / source + reblog


littlehorrorshop:

Happy Birthday Rose Joan Blondell! Born August 30 1906

Joan in “Remember My Forgotten Man” from Gold Diggers of 1933

"I did something extraordinary in that number, too, when I had Joan Blondell sing the song because Joan Blondell couldn’t sing. But I knew she could act it. I knew she could ‘talk it’ and put over the drama for me" - Busby Berkeley

Joan is galvanizing in “Remember My Forgotten Man.” In her few moments with the song she is sultry, vulnerable, bitter, and yearning. She is then followed by the magnificent Etta Moten, who provides the song a vocal melody. Later still, the soldiers, then bums, make for a powerful musicalization of politics and history. “Remember My Forgotten Man” is perhaps the most socially urgent song ever conceived for an American musical film.

Though it is specific to the Depression and the treatment of World War I veterans in a nation wanting for food and work, “Remember My Forgotten Man” has never gone out of date. What is government’s responsibility to the dispossessed? What are the effects of war and neglect on women? Joan’s character speaks to an ambivalence of the moment when she looks at a hard-luck veteran and says, “I don’t know if he deserves a bit of sympathy.” As someone reduced to streetwalking, the question could be asked of her as well. In six minutes and forty-five seconds, Berkeley treats us to prostitution, homelessness, veterans marching in the rain, bread lines, and desolate womanhood. The final image is a three-layered design of choreographic genius. In the back is a human canvas of marching soldiers in silhouette on multileveled semicircular pathways. In the middle is Joan, her arms outstretched in V formation for the final tableau. Surrounding her is a mass of hungry men, the former vets. They reach out to her in communion, each a victim of society’s betrayal.

From Joan Blondell: A Life Between Takes by Matthew Kennedy

shared 1 day ago, with 369 notes - via / source + reblog



Betty Grable, 1937

Betty Grable, 1937

shared 1 day ago, with 144 notes - via / source + reblog